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Diabetes
Our Diabetes section contains a range of medications that can be used to treat hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), also called non insulin-dependent diabetes or maturity-onset diabetes, to help lower blood sugar levels.

Principal brand name products are shown in the left column and generic alternatives or other generic products are to the right. Products are generally grouped by active ingredient.

Use the search feature to quickly find the product you are looking for, by entering either the active ingredient, e.g. metformin or the product name, e.g. Glyciphage.

...Read more
Our Diabetes section contains a range of medications that can be used to treat hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), also called non insulin-dependent diabetes or maturity-onset diabetes, to help lower blood sugar levels.

Principal brand name products are shown in the left column and generic alternatives or other generic products are to the right. Products are generally grouped by active ingredient.

Use the search feature to quickly find the product you are looking for, by entering either the active ingredient, e.g. metformin or the product name, e.g. Glyciphage.

...Read more

Amaryl 1mg (Glimepiride) 150's
Amaryl 1mg (Glimepiride) 150's
Glimepiride 1mg
Out Of Stock
Pioglar-15 (Pioglitazone) 10's
Pioglar-15 (Pioglitazone) 10's

Pioglitazone
Also known as Actos
From $0.86 per Tablet
Amaryl 1mg (Glimepiride) 300's
Amaryl 1mg (Glimepiride) 300's
Glimepiride 1mg
From $0.37 per Tablet
Pioglar-30 (Pioglitazone 30mg) 100's
Pioglar-30 (Pioglitazone 30mg) 100's

Pioglitazone
Also known as Actos
Out Of Stock
Pioglar-30 (Pioglitazone) 10's
Pioglar-30 (Pioglitazone) 10's

Pioglitazone
Also known as Actos
From $1.23 per Tablet
Amaryl 2mg (Glimepiride) 150's
Amaryl 2mg (Glimepiride) 150's
Glimepiride 2mg
Out Of Stock
Amaryl 2mg (Glimepiride) 300's
Amaryl 2mg (Glimepiride) 300's
Glimepiride 2mg
Discontinued
Daonil 5mg (Glibenclamide)
Daonil 5mg (Glibenclamide)
Glibenclamide 5mg
Also known as Glyburide or Diabeta
From $0.29 per Tablet
Glizide 80 (Gliclazide 80mg)
Glizide 80 (Gliclazide 80mg)

Gliclazide
From $0.08 per Tablet
Canagliflozin 100mg (Invokana) 30's
Canagliflozin 100mg (Invokana) 30's
Canagliflozin 100mg
Invokana 100mg
From $3.28 per Tablet
Canagliflozin 100mg (Invokana) 10's
Canagliflozin 100mg (Invokana) 10's
Canagliflozin 100mg
Invokana 100mg
Out Of Stock
Cetapin XR 500mg (Metformin) 150's
Cetapin XR 500mg (Metformin) 150's

Metformin 500mg
Sustained release metformin
From $0.25 per Tablet
Glucobay (Acarbose) 50mg
Glucobay (Acarbose) 50mg
Acarbose 50mg
From $0.23 per Tablet
Accarb 50 (Acarbose 50mg) 90 Tablets/Pack are used to control blood sugar in type-2 diabetes. They contain acarbose and you can buy Accarb 50 online from InhousePharmacy.vu
Accarb 50 (Acarbose 50mg)

Acarbose 50mg
From $0.27 per Tablet
Glucobay (Acarbose) 100mg
Glucobay (Acarbose) 100mg
Acarbose 100mg
From $0.28 per Tablet
Accarb 100 (Acarbose 100mg)
Accarb 100 (Acarbose 100mg)

Acarbose 100mg
Discontinued
Cetapin XR 500mg (Metformin) 100's
Cetapin XR 500mg (Metformin) 100's

Metformin 500mg
Sustained release metformin
Out Of Stock
Glyciphage 500mg  (Metformin)
Glyciphage 500mg (Metformin)

Metformin
From $0.12 per Tablet
APO-Gliclazide 80mg
APO-Gliclazide 80mg

Gliclazide 80mg
Also known as Diamicron
Discontinued
Metchek 500mg (Metformin)
Metchek 500mg (Metformin)

Metformin
From $0.06 per Tablet
Glyciphage 850mg  (Metformin)
Glyciphage 850mg (Metformin)

Metformin
From $0.15 per Tablet
Metformin 850mg 500 Tablets by Mylan
Metformin 850mg 500 Tablets by Mylan

Metformin 850mg
From $0.15 per Tablet
Cetapin XR 1000mg (Metformin) 150's
Cetapin XR 1000mg (Metformin) 150's

Metformin 1000mg
Sustained release metformin
Out Of Stock
Cetapin XR 1000mg (Metformin) 100's
Cetapin XR 1000mg (Metformin) 100's

Metformin 1000mg
Sustained release metformin
Out Of Stock
Glycomet-1 15 Tablets/Strip
Glycomet-1 15 Tablets/Strip

Metformin
Metformin Hydrochloride Sustained Release Tablets
From $0.70 per Tablet
Januvia 50mg (Sitagliptin)
Januvia 50mg (Sitagliptin)
Sitagliptin Phosphate
From $3.29 per Tablet
Januvia 100mg (Sitagliptin)
Januvia 100mg (Sitagliptin)
Sitagliptin Phosphate
From $3.29 per Tablet
Janumet 50mg/500mg (Sitagliptin/Metformin)
Janumet 50mg/500mg (Sitagliptin/Metformin)
Sitagliptin 50mg and Metformin 500mg
From $1.77 per Tablet
Janumet 50mg/1000mg (Sitagliptin/Metformin)
Janumet 50mg/1000mg (Sitagliptin/Metformin)
Sitagliptin 50mg and Metformin 1000mg
From $1.83 per Tablet
Minidiab 5mg (Glipizide)
Minidiab 5mg (Glipizide)
Glipizide
From $0.20 per Tablet
Glynase XL 5mg (Glipizide)
Glynase XL 5mg (Glipizide)

Glipizide SR
From $0.29 per Tablet
EPO Evening Primrose Oil
EPO Evening Primrose Oil
Nutritional supplement
Evening Primrose Oil Omega 6
From $0.21 per Capsule
Evening Primrose Oil 1000mg
Evening Primrose Oil 1000mg
Evening Primrose Oil 1000mg
Cold pressed
Out Of Stock
Opti CoQ10 150mg 30s
Opti CoQ10 150mg 30s
Coenzyme Q10 150mg + Fish Oil 500mg
Coenzyme Q10 + Fish Oil
From $1.27 per Capsule
Opti CoQ10 150mg 60s
Opti CoQ10 150mg 60s
Coenzyme Q10 150mg + Fish Oil 500mg
Coenzyme Q10 + Fish Oil
Out Of Stock
Viralex
Viralex
Olive leaf extract
Everyday immune booster
Out Of Stock
Viralex Attack Capsules 30's
Viralex Attack Capsules 30's
Olive leaf extract, Andrographis
From $0.68 per Capsule
Viralex Attack Capsules 60's
Viralex Attack Capsules 60's
Olive leaf extract, Andrographis
From $0.65 per Capsule
Flaxofibre Powder
Flaxofibre Powder
Ground flaxseed fibre
Fibre for bowel health
Discontinued

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease characterised by high blood sugar levels (hyperglycaemia) that are difficult to control. Type 2 diabetes mellitus T2DM usually begins later in life and is associated with risk factors, including obesity, poor diet and lack of exercise.
Sugar or glucose comes from the diet and is also manufactured in the liver. The body needs glucose for energy but high levels of glucose can cause serious harm. Blood sugar levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin that is produced by specific cells in the pancreas called beta cells. Insulin is released in response to increase in blood glucose, such as following a meal, to keep blood glucose within normal levels. The main role for insulin is to promote glucose uptake by the muscle cells where it is used and fat (adipose) cells where it is stored. Insulin also inhibits glucose production by liver cells when blood glucose levels increase.
Poor glycaemic control is the term used to describe what happens in diabetes and there are several reasons for this, including:
  • Chronic damage to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas, which results in impaired insulin production and therefore insufficient insulin to control blood sugar levels.
  • Insulin resistance by cells that normally respond to insulin but become resistant and no longer respond. Liver cells no longer responds to insulin, which should switch off glucose production and muscle and fat cells no longer take up glucose, which then stays in the blood.

How serious is diabetes?

Diabetes often develops well before it is diagnosed and without obvious symptoms when it is already causing damage. The most serious complications of T2DM include cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack and stroke. Also microvascular damage, which is damage to small blood vessels or capillaries in the eye, kidney or nerves. This causes diabetic retinopathy or damage to the retina, which can lead to blindness; diabetic nephropathy or kidney damage; and diabetic neuropathy or nerve damage which can lead to foot ulcers and extreme cases of microvascular damage can result in amputation.

Controlling blood sugar levels

There is no cure for diabetes as damage to the insulin producing cells cannot be reversed, therefore, gaining control over blood sugar levels is the goal of any treatment. Making lifestyle changes is the first step towards controlling blood sugar, including a sensible healthy diet and increased exercise. However, glycaemic control usually needs intervention with oral antihyperglycaemic (OA) medications, which are tablets that lower blood sugar levels. These medications reduce high blood sugar levels after a meal, keep blood sugar levels down between meals and reduce the amount of sugar made in the liver.

Types of diabetes medication

Several different classes of OA diabetes medication are available and each class works by a different mechanism. Most of these medications can be used alone as monotherapy, in conjunction with diet and exercise, or in combination with each other. They include:
  • Biguanides like metformin work by increasing sensitivity to insulin in the target tissues which are liver, fat and muscle; suppressing glucose produced by the liver; increasing glucose uptake by muscle cells and reducing absorption of glucose form the diet by the small intestine.

  • Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors like acarbose inhibit the action of the enzyme alpha-glucosidase that converts carbohydrates in the diet to simple sugars like glucose and this reduces the amount of glucose that enters the blood after a meal (posprandial).

  • Thiazolidinediones like rosiglitazone and pioglitazone reduce insulin resistance by interacting with specific receptors on the insulin-reactive cells of the liver, muscle and fat tissue, which increases their responsiveness to insulin.

  • Sulphonylureas like glipizide increase insulin production by directly stimulating the beta cells, which are the insulin-producing cells of pancreas, to produce more insulin.

  • DPP-4 inhibitors like sitagliptin work by inhibiting the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) and thereby preventing the breakdown of two small proteins called incretins that are released from the intestine after a meal. The incretins stimulate glucose-dependent insulin production from pancreatic beta cells to lower blood glucose levels; as well as suppressing glucagon release from the pancreatic alpha cells to reduce glucose production in the liver. Incretins are normally rapidly degraded by DPP-4 and it is this degradation that DPP-4 inhibitors prevent, to allow incretins to help maintain normal blood glucose levels for longer.

...Read more

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease characterised by high blood sugar levels (hyperglycaemia) that are difficult to control. Type 2 diabetes mellitus T2DM usually begins later in life and is associated with risk factors, including obesity, poor diet and lack of exercise.
Sugar or glucose comes from the diet and is also manufactured in the liver. The body needs glucose for energy but high levels of glucose can cause serious harm. Blood sugar levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin that is produced by specific cells in the pancreas called beta cells. Insulin is released in response to increase in blood glucose, such as following a meal, to keep blood glucose within normal levels. The main role for insulin is to promote glucose uptake by the muscle cells where it is used and fat (adipose) cells where it is stored. Insulin also inhibits glucose production by liver cells when blood glucose levels increase.
Poor glycaemic control is the term used to describe what happens in diabetes and there are several reasons for this, including:
  • Chronic damage to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas, which results in impaired insulin production and therefore insufficient insulin to control blood sugar levels.
  • Insulin resistance by cells that normally respond to insulin but become resistant and no longer respond. Liver cells no longer responds to insulin, which should switch off glucose production and muscle and fat cells no longer take up glucose, which then stays in the blood.

How serious is diabetes?

Diabetes often develops well before it is diagnosed and without obvious symptoms when it is already causing damage. The most serious complications of T2DM include cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack and stroke. Also microvascular damage, which is damage to small blood vessels or capillaries in the eye, kidney or nerves. This causes diabetic retinopathy or damage to the retina, which can lead to blindness; diabetic nephropathy or kidney damage; and diabetic neuropathy or nerve damage which can lead to foot ulcers and extreme cases of microvascular damage can result in amputation.

Controlling blood sugar levels

There is no cure for diabetes as damage to the insulin producing cells cannot be reversed, therefore, gaining control over blood sugar levels is the goal of any treatment. Making lifestyle changes is the first step towards controlling blood sugar, including a sensible healthy diet and increased exercise. However, glycaemic control usually needs intervention with oral antihyperglycaemic (OA) medications, which are tablets that lower blood sugar levels. These medications reduce high blood sugar levels after a meal, keep blood sugar levels down between meals and reduce the amount of sugar made in the liver.

Types of diabetes medication

Several different classes of OA diabetes medication are available and each class works by a different mechanism. Most of these medications can be used alone as monotherapy, in conjunction with diet and exercise, or in combination with each other. They include:
  • Biguanides like metformin work by increasing sensitivity to insulin in the target tissues which are liver, fat and muscle; suppressing glucose produced by the liver; increasing glucose uptake by muscle cells and reducing absorption of glucose form the diet by the small intestine.

  • Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors like acarbose inhibit the action of the enzyme alpha-glucosidase that converts carbohydrates in the diet to simple sugars like glucose and this reduces the amount of glucose that enters the blood after a meal (posprandial).

  • Thiazolidinediones like rosiglitazone and pioglitazone reduce insulin resistance by interacting with specific receptors on the insulin-reactive cells of the liver, muscle and fat tissue, which increases their responsiveness to insulin.

  • Sulphonylureas like glipizide increase insulin production by directly stimulating the beta cells, which are the insulin-producing cells of pancreas, to produce more insulin.

  • DPP-4 inhibitors like sitagliptin work by inhibiting the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) and thereby preventing the breakdown of two small proteins called incretins that are released from the intestine after a meal. The incretins stimulate glucose-dependent insulin production from pancreatic beta cells to lower blood glucose levels; as well as suppressing glucagon release from the pancreatic alpha cells to reduce glucose production in the liver. Incretins are normally rapidly degraded by DPP-4 and it is this degradation that DPP-4 inhibitors prevent, to allow incretins to help maintain normal blood glucose levels for longer.

...Read more

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